Team

Home // Tesse Stek // Jeremia Pelgrom // Rogier Kalkers // Anita Casarotto // Jesús García Sánchez // Marleen Termeer // Jitte Waagen // Lisa Götz // Arthur Hamel //Alessia Guidi //Maria Luisa Marchi // Lucia Lecce // Helga Di Giuseppe // Sheila Cherubini // Jan Sevink // Hans Kamermans // Ruud van Otterloo



Tesse Stek TesseStek
Leiden University – Project director

Funding:
NWO Free Competition project: Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization. Non-urban settlement organization and Roman expansion in the Roman Republic (4th-1st centuries BC) [Link]
NWO VENI Project: Colonial rural networks. Dispersed settlement and colonial expansion in the Roman Republic (c. 4th -1st centuries BC) [Link]

E-mail address: t.d.stek@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 2929
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room B1.10)
Website: Personal page Leiden University

About:

Tesse D. Stek is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Archaeology of Leiden University. His work concentrates on the Classical, Hellenistic and early Roman periods in Italy, especially on the Italic peoples and the rise and impact of Rome. His PhD thesis, resulting in the book Cult Places and Cultural Change in Republican Italy (Amsterdam 2009), focused on the impact of Rome in the realm of religion and rural settlement organization. It argues for a stronger Roman impact in these spheres than previously assumed, by pointing out unexpected patterns in early Roman expansion strategies. He taught Greek, Italic and Roman archaeology at the Universities of Amsterdam and Nijmegen and conducted postdoctoral research on early Roman colonization at the University of Oxford (Brasenose College, Golding JRF, Rubicon) and the University of Glasgow (Marie Curie IEF). At Leiden, he currently coordinates the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project (Free Competition, NWO) as well as the closely related Colonial rural networks project (Veni, NWO). Besides the fieldwork on Roman colonization, he coordinates excavations at the rural sanctuary of S. Giovanni in Galdo, Colle Rimontato, in ancient Samnium.
Recent outcomes of these projects include the edited volumes Roman Republican Colonization. New perspectives from archaeology and ancient history (ed. T.D. Stek, J. Pelgrom) and The impact of Rome on cult places and religious practices in ancient Italy (ed. T.D. Stek, G.J. Burgers).


Jeremia Pelgrom JeremiaPelgrom
The Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome (KNIR) –  Co-direction from KNIR


E-mail address: j.pelgrom@knir.it
Telephone number: +39 06 326962 29
Office address: Via Omero 10/12, 00197 Roma – Italia
Website: Personal page KNIR

About:


Rogier Kalkers RogierKalkers
Leiden University – Project assistant

Funding:
NWO Free Competition project: Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization. Non-urban settlement organization and Roman expansion in the Roman Republic (4th-1st centuries BC) [Link]

E-mail address: r.a.a.kalkers@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 6091
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room B1.12)
Website: Personal page Leiden University

About:
Rogier Kalkers has studied Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Amsterdam and at the Roma Tre University, and did his Masters in Landscape Archaeology at the VU University in Amsterdam. In his thesis, he explored the effects of different research traditions on the conceptualization of archaeological landscapes on the basis of a case study in Molise, Central/Southern Italy. Rogier has participated in a large number of fieldwork projects in Lazio, Etruria, Sicily, Greece and the Netherlands and is a long-term collaborator in the various Dutch field survey and excavation campaigns in Molise (CLP Aesernia surveys // SLP surveys // San Giovanni in Galdo – Colle Rimontato excavations // Terra Incognita Project – Rotello / Larino Project). Within the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project he is responsible for the management and analysis of field and find data, the organisation and execution of fieldwork campaigns, and managing the project’s data repository.


Anita Casarotto AnitaCasarotto
Leiden University – PhD researcher

Funding:
NWO Free Competition subproject: Settlement ecologies: location preference and land-use in colonial and non-colonial landscapes [Link]

E-mail address: a.casarotto@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 1267
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room B1.12)
Website: Personal page Leiden University

About:
Anita Casarotto obtained a Bachelor degree in Archaeology and a Master degree cum laude in Archaeological Sciences, both at the University of Padova. She also completed an additional two-year post-graduate programme, the Scuola di Specializzazione in Beni Archeologici, at the same university. She participated in numerous archaeological field surveys and excavations in Italy (mainly in the regions of Veneto, Trentino-Alto Adige and Calabria).
The main topic of her bachelor, master and specialization theses was the application of predictive modelling in both Archaeology for exploring location preferences and settlement strategies, and CRM as a mean to assess archaeological potential for spatial planning policy and to guide future developments in the modern landscape.
Currently she is doing a PhD in the Early Roman Colonial Landscapes project, which is aimed at the implementation of a predictive model for the study of settlement ecologies in colonial and non-colonial landscapes of Central-Southern Italy during the formative phase of the Roman Empire (4th-1st centuries BC).


Jesús García Sánchez JesusGarciaSanchez
Leiden University – Post-doctoral researcher

Funding:
NWO Free Competition project: Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization. Non-urban settlement organization and Roman expansion in the Roman Republic (4th-1st centuries BC) [Link]

E-mail address: j.garcia.sanchez@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 2392
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room B1.12)
Website: Personal page Leiden University

About:
Jesús García Sánchez obtained his BA in University of Salamanca (2006) and holds a PhD from University of Cantabria (2012), and a MA in Multivariate Statics from Faculty of Salamanca (2014). His principal research interest is survey methodology and Landscape archaeology applied to the Late Iron Age and Classic Roman Archaeology. He has directed several survey projects in the Northern Plateau (Burgos, Spain) from 2009-20102 focusing on Iron Age and Roman settlements to assess landscape exploitation as cultural behavior in the so-called Ager Segisamonsis and also intra-site intensive surveys to study household assemblages in Burgos and La Rioja. In 2011 Jesús co-directed with Miguel Cisneros the excavation of La Ulaña hill-fort (Humada, Burgos), the largest Iron Age site in the Iberian Peninsula. He also had a project funded by Obra Social Caja Burgos for an aerial survey reconnaissance in northwest Burgos that produced the discovery of new important features to understand the hinterland of ancient Segisamo (Sasamón, Burgos).

His more recent works combines aerial photography, survey methodology, pottery analysis, and multivariate statistical analysis of assemblages variability on intra-site surveys (Odra valley Survey, Spain and Aesernia, italy). Apart from Iberian peninsula-based projects he has actively worked for other Mediterranean projects in Italy (Tappino Valley survey, Colonial Landscape Project Aesernia and Venusia Survey with Leiden Universiteit and KNIR and Potentia Valley Survey with Gent University), Greece (Boeotia Survey) and Israel (Kinneret Project).


Marleen Termeer MarleenTermeer
Leiden University – Post-doctoral researcher

Funding:
NWO Free Competition project: Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization. Non-urban settlement organization and Roman expansion in the Roman Republic (4th-1st centuries BC) [Link]

E-mail address: m.k.termeer@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 6316
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room B1.07)
Website: Personal page Leiden University

About:
Marleen obtained her Bachelor and Research Master degrees at the University of Amsterdam (cum laude), and studied as an exchange student at the Università degli Studi di Bologna. As a student, she participated in several excavations and field surveys in Italy (Lazio, Puglia, Sicily). Her involvement in the excavations at Satricum (Lazio) were the first impetus for a master’s thesis on early colonization in Latium before 338 BC.
Ever since, the subject of Roman colonization has been central to her research. Her PhD thesis, written at the University of Groningen, is entitled Latin colonization in Italy before the end of the Second Punic War: Colonial communities and cultural change. Drawing on a wide range of archaeological and historical sources, it shows how local developments in the Latin colonies contributed to broader processes of cultural change in Mid Republican Italy.
Marleen was already partly involved in the fieldwork of the LERC project during her PhD research. In her present project, she will use the case of Aesernia to investigate how the foundation of the colony impacted on the objectscape, and how objects helped shaping the colonial reality. Rather than identifying certain categories of material culture as ‘colonial’, she aims to investigate how the foundation of the colony changes the networks of production and exchange in which the colony was active.


Affiliated researchers

Jitte Waagen JitteWaagen
Amsterdam University – Affiliated researcher

PhD position at the Amsterdam Archaeological Centre, University of Amsterdam, ‘Finds and Models: quantitative approaches and spatial models for archaeological fieldsurvey.’

E-mail address: j.waagen@uva.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)20 525 8776
Office address: Turfdraagsterpad 9, 1012 XT Amsterdam – The Netherlands (Room 3.03)
Website: Personal page Amsterdam University

About:
Jitte holds a MA in Mediterranean Archaeology from the VU University of Amsterdam, with a specialization in theoretical archaeology. He is currently employed as a specialist in computational archaeology at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and holds a PhD position as part of the Archaeology of Cultural Landscapes and Natural Environments research group. His thesis with the preliminary title ‘Finds and Models: quantitative approaches and spatial models for archaeological field survey’ deals with methodology of site and off-site survey, quantitative analyses and the so-called debate on ‘hidden landscapes’/’missing sites’. Jitte has participated in a number of research projects in The Netherlands, Greece and Turkey, but mostly in Italy, of which the SLP, TIP/LAR and TVS campaigns in Molise. Within the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project he is responsible for the methodological design and quantitative analyses of the Tappino Valley Survey, the design of a database for comparing legacy datasets, and co-responsible for maintaining GIS datasets of past and present projects.


Lisa Götz LisaGötz
Leiden University – Affiliated researcher

External PhD-researcher at Leiden University, ‘Colonial contacts and networking: The material culture in Roman Colonies in Central Italy in Republican Period.’

E-mail address: l.c.goetz@umail.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number:
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands
Website: Personal page Academia.edu

About:
Lisa obtained a Magister Artium in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History with distinction (ausgezeichnet) at the Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg (Germany). In 2012 she started as an external PhD researcher at Leiden University. Her research on Roman colonies in the border region of Latium/Campania is a continuation of her MA work. By using a multi methodological approach in analyzing the material culture she is investigating the connections between colonies and hinterland within the wider local and regional scale.
During her studies in Germany, Italy and the Netherlands she took part in various international fieldwork projects including archaeological excavations and architectural investigations (rilievi) in Latium and Campania. Since 2012 she has worked as a supervisor on the archaeological investigations of Leiden University at the Palatine Hill in Rome. Her involvement with the survey and study campaigns in Molise (CLP Aesernia and TVS) also started in this period. Within the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project Lisa is actively engaged in studying the ceramics and in the organization of the study campaigns.


Arthur Hamel ArthurHamel
Leiden University – Affiliated researcher

External PhD-researcher at Leiden University, ‘Hidden landscapes of Roman colonization: Assessing the effects of landscape and land-use changes on the visibility of archaeological landscapes in Central-Southern Italy.’

E-mail address: a.c.hamel@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 2727
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room B1.07)
Website: Personal page Academia.edu

About:
Arthur Hamel studied both geography and archaeology at the University of Strasbourg. He then did his MSc in Geoarchaeology at the VU University of Amsterdam, mostly focusing on landscape changes making use of remote sensing, aerial photography and geophysics. His Master thesis concerned the aerial survey of the sub-urban area along the fifth mile of the Via Appia (Rome) as part of the Via Appia project, under the supervision of Jeremia Pelgrom and Steven Soetens.
After graduation, he took part in the LERC project, conducting geophysical surveys and working with remote sensing and aerial imagery around the two Roman colonies of Aesernia and Venusia (Molise and Basilicata, Italy). He recently obtained a PhD position in Leiden working on a project entitled “Hidden landscapes of Roman colonization” which should add to the important debate on Roman colonization in Italy by assessing the impact of environmental and/or man-made changes in landscape and land use on the visibility of the archaeological record.


Alessia Guidi AlessiaGuidi
University of Molise, Campobasso – Affiliated researcher


E-mail address: alessiaguidi80@gmail.com
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 2727
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room B1.02)
Website: Personal page Academia.edu

About:
Alessia Guidi obtained her BA at the University of Perugia (2005) and a specialization degree in Archaeological Heritage at the University of Padua (2012). She currently works as a graduate student in Innovation and Management of Public Resources – Cultural Heritage and Development of Tourism at the University of Molise in Campobasso. Between December 2016 and June 2017, Alessia will be working as a visiting scholar at the Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University, in close collaboration with the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project.
Her main research interests are ancient floor coverings and, specifically, ceramics of the pre-Roman and Roman period. She has studied floor coverings of the Molise region, resulting in a computerized cataloguing process in the framework of the TESS project at the University of Padua. Furthermore, she was involved in the international project Tutela, studio e valorizzazione di un patrimonio museale (Preservation, study and valorization of museum heritage) at the Museum of the Studium Biblicum Franciscanum in Jerusalem, Israel (2012-2016). The main objective of this project was to make a systematic survey of the assets, information filing and digitization, in particular concerning Greek and Roman antiquities and pottery. The project was co-founded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Associazione pro Terra Sancta (Association in Support of the Holy Land), and by the University of Molise.
Her more recent work focuses on black gloss ware and its production. She is currently studying the ceramics from the excavations underneath the cathedral of Isernia and, in the context of her Ph.D. research, a pottery kiln site in the territory of ancient Venafrum (modern Venafro, Molise).
In 2015 e 2016 she taught a course on the Archaeology of the Ancient World at the department of Biosciences and Territory of the University of Molise.


Maria Luisa Marchi MariaLuisaMarchi
University of Foggia – Affiliated researcher

E-mail address: marialuisa.marchi@unifg.it
Telephone number: +39 0881 750341
Office address: Via Arpi 176, 71121 Foggia, Italy
Website: Personal page Academia.edu

About:


Lucia Lecce LuciaLecce
University of Basilicata, Matera – Affiliated researcher

E-mail address: lucialecce@libero.it
Telephone number:
Office address:
Website: Personal page Academia.edu

About:
Lucia Lecce holds a BA in Archaeology of Magna Graecia, and a MA in Classical Archaeology, both from the Suor Orsola Benincasa University in Naples, and a Postgraduate degree in the Archaeology of Italic Peoples and of Magna Graecia at the University of Basilicata, Matera, all cum laude.
She has worked for numerous fieldwork and study projects in different contexts (Roman, Italic and Italiote): amongst others at Pompeii, Torre di Satriano, Metapontum, and recently in Molise. Ever since she started her academic career, she has focused her interests on material culture studies, ceramic productions, relationships between Greek, Italic and Roman peoples. Her research has been supported with fellowships by national and international institutions (e.g. History and Archaeology of Magna Graecia Institute – Taranto, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome). Currently she is involved in the ‘Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum – Matera project’ (in press), and she is preparing an exhibition at the National Archeological Museum of Matera.
As part of the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization Project Lucia is studying the Black-gloss ware from the Latin colony of Venusia and its surroundings. The goal of this research is to reconstruct a complete framework of morphologies, productions and chronologies, especially for the complex phase between the end of the fourth and the beginning of the third century BC, when the colony was established.


Helga Di Giuseppe HelgaDiGiuseppe
Affiliated researcher

E-mail address: helgadigiuseppe@gmail.com
Telephone number:
Office address:
Website: Personal page Academia.edu

About:


Sheila Cherubini
University of Rome “La Sapienza” – Affiliated researcher

E-mail address:
Telephone number:
Office address:
Website:

About:


Jan Sevink
University of Amsterdam – Affiliated researcher

E-mail address: J.Sevink@uva.nl
Telephone number:
Office address: Science Park 904, Amsterdam
Website: Personal page Amsterdam University

About:


Hans Kamermans HansKamermans
Leiden University – Affiliated researcher

E-mail address: h.kamermans@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 2385
Office address: Van Steenis Building – Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC Leiden – The Netherlands (Room A1.13B)
Website: Personal webpage Leiden University

About:
Hans Kamermans is associate professor at the Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University. He studied ecological prehistory and physical geography in Amsterdam and wrote his PhD thesis on the use of land evaluation in archaeology. In Leiden he teaches archaeological methods and techniques and various courses in computer applications in archaeology.
His research is in the field of computer applications in archaeology (predictive modelling, GIS, the use of computers in the field, sampling techniques). In the 1980th, he co-directed the Agro Pontino survey in Italy and he was involved in fieldwork in Geleen (the Netherlands), Boxgrove, Happisburgh and Barnham (England), the Vézère valley (France), Neumark (Germany) and Ostia (Italy). He is a member of the international steering committee of CAA (Computer Applications and quantitative methods in Archaeology) and a member of the International Advisory Editorial Committee of the journal ‘Internet Archaeology’.
He was coordinator of ArcheoNet, a thematic network in archaeology established in 1996 and involved in various European Erasmus exchange projects. Recently he was a member of Ancient Charm, an EU-funded ADVENTURE research project, an action line of NEST (New and Emerging Science and Technology), an activity in the Sixth Framework Programme (FP6). Currently he is involved in three European projects: Archaeolandscapes (ArcLand), ARIADNE and CEEDS.
He directed from 2002 until 2007 the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) project “Strategic research into and development of best practice for, predictive modelling on behalf of Dutch Cultural Resource Management” and was main applicant of the successful NWO project “Edna II – Taking the electronic archive for Dutch Archaeology to the next level”.


Ruud van Otterloo
Independent affiliated researcher

E-mail address:
Telephone number:
Office address:
Website:

About:


© 2017 Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project, Faculty of Archaeology – Leiden University

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